Kindness

Fune Hui was a Chinese man that lived in China in a little town translated as Fairview. He was a very rich man that lived richly because he was very stingy with his money. He didn't care what it cost other people. He didn't buy anything unless he could get it cheaper than the original price. All of the people that worked for him got less that minimum wage and if they complained, he tossed them out onto the street with nothing. The people in the village hated him and as the years passed, the town became poorer and poorer as he grew richer and richer. The children slept under roofs that leaked on their heads and they cried from always being hungry. The parents wept because they were miserable and they couldn't do anything to help their children. One day, Fune Hui went to town and fell in love with a woman at the first sight of her. She had dark hair and her skin was the fairest that he had ever seen on any woman until now. She was trying to sell her cow and she was talking to a man that was looking at it. When the man left, Fune Hui went over to her and asked her if the cow was hers and how much it was. "I'm sorry sir, but I have already sold her." "How much did you sell her for?" asked Fune Hui. "For five silver."

"I'll give you six for her." He was very surprised that he said that for it wasn't like him to pay more for something than he had to. Everyone there that heard him say this was greatly surprised even more than he was. "No, sir. You are very kind but a deal is a deal." "Has he paid for her yet?" "No." "Then the deal isn't final." "It is to me. I thank you but I have already given my word and I can't take it back now." "Why are you selling her?" "I am selling Beauty because my father is sick and we need the money." Just at that moment, the man came back and paid for the cow. The girl smiled and kissed the cow on the nose lovingly, a small tear in her eye. Fune Hui felt jealous of that cow. The girl then thanked the man that had bought her cow and left. As soon as she was out of sight, Fune Hui turned to the man and began to point out all the flaws in the item he just bought. "I can't believe you bought the cow for that much. Notice the poor shade of his fur. And the teeth! Goodness. It looks as if."

**

There was a knock on the girl's door later and she answered, surprised to see the man there and her cow behind him. Her eyes widened and she smiled at the man, "Where did you get her?"

"I bought her off the man that bought her from you." He didn't think that he had to mention that he bought her for one less silver than the other man had paid for her. "I thought that she would be happier here with you." "Won't you need her?" "When I need her, I will come and get her. In the meantime, she can stay here with you. You can use her to help your father get better." The woman smiled and Fune Hui asked, "What is your name?" "My name is Mirth, kind sir."

**

When Fune Hui came back with his new bride, the town was shocked. How can that girl love someone such as him? Nevertheless, she did and she continued to think of him as kind. He loved that word. It became the sole purpose for him to do anything helpful and good for her. He would bring her flowers, small trinkets, or new ribbons for her hair. When he did she would smile and thank him. Just to see her smile would be enough, but she called him kind also and that was even better. When she died a year later, leaving him a daughter, he named the child after her and continued to do nice things. She became everything to him. When he took her to the fields, he would give her fresh fruit and he did indeed take her everywhere with him. When the day came that he put a ribbon in her hair and she said with a smile, "Kind da'," he became hooked. From then on, he didn't do things just to do them. He did them to hear her call him kind. It became an addiction. Everything he did, was for the purpose to pull those words from her as they did her mother.

**

One day, he was going through his fields, observing the farming when he heard a child crying. Thinking it was his Mirth, he ran to the gate where he discovered that it wasn't his daughter, but the little girl who was standing beside her. "Why are you crying, child?" Mirth looked up at her father and said, "She is crying because she lost her penny." Mirth turned to the little girl and said, "That is my kind dad and he will give you another penny." Mirth looked up at her father with shinny and trusting eyes. Not knowing why he did so, Fune Hui reached into his pocket and pulled out a penny to give to the little girl. Her tears dried up and she thanked him, running home. Fune Hui picked up his daughter and asked, "Who was that child?"

"That was Nyssa." "Whose child is she?" Mirth shrugged, "She's just Nyssa."

Fune Hui nodded, for that was all the info he was going to get from his four year old.

**

Soon after that, the entire town was talking about how Fune Hui had given away a penny. "Given it away! No! He never would do such a thing." "He did. And to Farmer Pooh's little girl." "Farmer Pooh? Really? Didn't Pooh leave Hui after he cut his pay and said, 'Someday you and yours will want just as me and mine do?'" "He indeed did. What is becoming of the town these days?"

**

After that, Fune Hui did more and more things for his daughter. When Mirth brought him a beggar and said he was hungry, the beggar walked out of his house with a coat and new shoes. The town was shocked. "New shoes? A coat! But beggars don't go there. They turn away from his house." Yet, it was true. Then his daughter wanted a party and he said okay. 'Won't be more than nine silver,' he thought. And the town people were shocked when the party was held and they all whispered, "Next he'll fund the hospital." Soon after the party, Mirth became sick and was in the hospital for several days. After she came home, the hospital caught on fire and burned to the ground. Knowing that his daughter could get sick again, he sold his hotel to pay for the rebuilding of the hospital. The money situation bothered him. His daughter would sit on his lap at nights and tell him stories of the town. "Little Suzy can't sleep because the water drips from the roof and onto her face and Emily needs new shoes." Now he no longer did things just for his daughter. There comes a point where a father can only do so much for his children. Just doing things for Mirth wasn't enough. He did things for all the children in the town also because it made Mirth happy. However, his money and his property decreased and he worried about the future of his daughter. He needed to put money away for her but he was giving it to the town and once he started, he couldn't stop. His daughter no longer had to ask him to do things. He did them without asking and he stayed awake at night because, like his daughter telling him he was nice when he did things for her, he couldn't stop doing things for the town. The town praised his name and his daughter was welcomed everywhere. If she saw a problem, she went to her father because he was rich and she knew that he could fix it. She loved her father and she believed in him.

**

Over the years, the town became rich and prospered, as Fune Hui grew poorer and more worried about not being able to keep himself from throwing all his money away. The other towns heard of Fairview and the kindness of Fune Hui and wondered how someone could throw everything away. One day, Fune Hui set his daughter down and asked her, "How would you like to move with me into the woods and live in a little cottage there?" Mirth smiled and exclaimed, "Oh father, I would love to!" Therefore, Fune Hui sold the rest of his land that he hadn't already sold for money, then he sold his large house and they moved into the woods. At night, Fune Hui couldn't sleep. He thought of the time of his death and worried about Mirth's future. He knew that she would have nowhere to go and it made him sad. What kind of father doesn't plan a future for his children? In these times, he was reminded of farmer Pooh's words, 'When you and yours,' and he knew that there was nothing much he could do. The day after Fune Hui moved, the orphanage received a huge anonymous donation and Fune Hui started working on the land that he owned just a short time ago. Yet, through all of this, Mirth was happy. When she walked home with her father, she would give some of their last coins to the beggars on the streets so that everyday after spending the last few pennies on bread and cheese that he had earned that day from working, Fune Hui walked home with empty pockets. Yet, they had more food than was expected for the house became know to the townspeople as Hui's place and mothers would tell their children to drop off things there on their way to school. In this way, the small family had flour, berries, pies and other things that the people gave them. One day Mirth went to one of the neighbor's homes and said, "My father won't wake up. I tried to wake him, but he won't wake." The neighbors nodded to each other and said to her, "Stay here. We'll check on him."

**

Three days later, the funeral was held and all the townspeople followed the coffin. The townspeople had all grown to like him over the years and by this time, they all knew that he had died penniless. Having given everything he had to the town, he had left nothing for his daughter and no home either. "I suppose that she has to go to the orphanage now," remarked one man. But another woman spoke up, "I'll be damned if the daughter of Fune Hui is going to that place! I'll take her in." "Yes, we all owe him and besides, if you all think about it, in a way, he owns the whole town," responded Farmer Pooh, who had gotten over the way he was treated by Fune Hui. There preceded an argument over who was going to take her. It seemed that the whole town owed Fune Hui for something he had done for them and they all wanted to help his daughter now that he was gone. Therefore, it happened that all fifty-two of the houses in the village each got her for one week of the year. Mirth was proud of her father and she smiled at the arrangements, not fully understanding what was going on, only knowing that they all loved her kind father and that was good enough for her.

An: This was written for my History class during the time we were studding China and the Confucius belief. So there is a moral to this tale. *smiles* Thought you don't have to, I'd love it if you were to tell me what you think. Maybe I can get into writing similar things.