FINAL DRAFT: REAPERS

As much as none of us want to admit it, we all know that life will just continue on after we die. We all want to believe that we have made such a large impact on the world that life will come to a complete halt at our passing. However, this is usually not the case. In the poem "Reapers" the use of imagery, tone, rhyme scheme, and alliteration convey the thought that life in the world continues even in the dreariest of times.

In the poem imagery is used to discuss the fact that life continues on after a tragic occurrence. For example, the author states, "And there, a field rat, startled, squealing bleeds." This shows how suddenly death can happen to anyone or anything in the world. It is an inescapable fate that we all must face. In addition the author says, "I see the blade, bloodstained, continue cutting weeds and shade." This shows the harsh reality of death in the world. It also shows the continuation of life in the world after death. The author's use of imagery supported the theme that life continues after a tragic occurrence.

Tone is also used in the poem to explain that life keeps going after something tragic has transpired. For example, the author says, "I see them place the hones in their hip-pockets as a thing that's done, and start their silent swinging one by one." This shows an acceptance of daily activities that the author sees happening. It is important because it shows why the author views death the way that he does. In addition the author says, "continue cutting weeds and shade." This portrays the sadness he feels about death, but how he accepts it. He seems accepting of it because it seems just like another common activity. The author's use of tone supported the theme that life continues after a tragic occurrence.

In the poem rhyme scheme and alliteration are used to discuss how life continues on after a tragic occurrence. For example the rhyme scheme of the poem is, "stones/hones (AA), done/one (BB), weeds/bleeds (CC), blade/shade (DD)." It is a very regular rhyme scheme with hardly any change. This is symbolic of the consistent way death occurs. The author also uses alliteration in, "sharpening scythes, silent swinging, continue cutting." This indicates the slow flowing way in which life goes on and the harsh way it ends. The author takes advantage of the harsh sound of the words "continue cutting" to show this harshness. The author's use of rhyme scheme and alliteration supported the theme that life in the world continues even in the dreariest of times.

Although death can be a frightening thing to think about, it's better to just accept it because it is not something that can be completely escaped. Most of the poem discussed is heavily laden with symbolism about the author's thoughts on how the world views death.